Drabble: Making Light of Dark

 

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Got my newest drabble posted on thedrabble.com – go check out the site; it’s great!

By A.R. Frederiksen “I wish they’d just take it,” her mother said. “It can’t be worse, can it?” Julia looked from her coffee cup to the fridge. A myriad of notes, all A4 with no post-its in sight, sat plastered all over the appliance, the lettering dark and big and bold. Too big and too […]

via Making Light of Dark —

Drabble: “Gods of Egypt”

She wants to be a model, but she is born into a family of butchers.
At age twenty, she sleeps with a God of Egypt. He reaches up and touches her, bringing her through the nights with whiskers that poke her cheeks. One day, life grows inside of her. She calls him Moses, but one night Mr. Jackal pushes in too hard, and he takes Moses back; Moses will bring no plagues to Egypt. She changes her name to Nefertiti, a Queen of old, believing that this will leave no room for butchers – and yet, she knows, Mr. Jackal stays.

(Inspired by this poem of my own – also, this is a piece of fiction; I’m not out to bash religions or some such nonsense, m’kay? It’s pure creative inspiration, that’s all.)

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WriterWoes #6 – Flash Fiction: a fear of formats?

So, this is a problem – or maybe something less severe than a problem, but still a problem – that I’ve come across lately, both here on my own blog, but also elsewhere. Whereas story formats like the novel and the short story are as old as time, there are the newer formats which have become popular due to the rise of digitalization, the information age, and any other spiffy term that indicates the 2000s. These are the “easily digestible” formats; the ones that offer instant gratification, because for some reason, a lot of millennials know nothing of patience.

Also, I’m twenty-six years old, mind you, which makes me a millennial, and yet I am old enough to know the patience of dial-up internet.

So, what am I saying here?

Well, I’m really trying to put words to the fickleness of the newer story formats that I myself engage in.

When is it a six-word story, and when is it a writing prompt?

What makes it a drabble, and what makes it a vignette?

Can a fifty-word story be 51, or must it be 50 characters?

Also, Twitterature, people – huh?

What about fanfiction and fandoms; what part have they played in this, if any?

Working with the flash fiction format, here, on my own blog, I’ve found that when it comes to flash fiction, there are so few rules set in place, and so little guidance to find.

What’s more; do we follow the rules, or do we follow the customs?

With the flash fiction format, new and flourishing, it is indeed hard to get a good grasp on the format…

… but is that also not what makes it interesting?

Playing with flash fiction (and, really, playing with any kind of newer format within any kind of creative art) is like playing with your mother’s lipstick as a five-year-old. You don’t know what you’re doing, and you feel as if you’re not supposed to be doing it, but there’s nothing stoppin’ you— aaaaah, is that glitter lipstick?!

And, so, yes, what are your thoughts on this, readers of mine, old as new?

I’d love to hear some inputs; for all that I know, I’m simply inexperienced and could do with a wise word or two from an Exalted One – does anybody volunteer?