LivelyLightbulbs #1

“Don’t rely on the bulb to light up on its own; power it yourself!”

I longed for a series that was less about my writings and more about what drives the creative process behind it.

Thus, lo and behold, LivelyLightbulbs came into sweet cyberspace existence!

Now, where to start – authors, music, painters, sculptors… food… ferrets?

Well, this is a writing blog, so it would be proper to focus on authors at first, but, in all honesty, I’d rather focus on what inspires me at this very moment.

And at this very moment, my inspiration comes from watercolors!

Or, more precisely, my first ever foray into watercolors (sans childhood dabbling)!

Having painted with acrylics all my life, developing an abstract and impressionistic style, I’ve felt attracted to watercolors for some time. Despite the difference in texture and feel, they have some of the same characteristics that abstract acrylics do, so I guess that my interest in them should not be a surprise.

With acrylics, I paint wet-on-wet.

As such, with watercolors, I decided on doing the same…

… after doing a bit of research on watercolor techniques.

At first, before doing research, I tried to wing it, just for fun, figuring that after a lifetime of acrylics I had to at least be able to make something of worth. Please look at the result below:


Now, please look at the result after I did a bit of research:

Needless to say, I was severely disappointed in myself with the first result, which then resulted in the second result… and then my disappointment was washed away – so yay!

Anyway, I’ve always worked best with warm and earthy tones, something that obviously also comes into play this time around – and something that will likely never change.

What does painting, be it watercolor or acrylics, do for me, then, in regards to writing?

Painting makes my brain go creatively blank in a way that writing does not.

Painting, for me, is centered on color-play and less on motifs.

Also, for me, impressionism and abstract art rely heavily on emotion.

With emotion, I can let my brain go completely blank in a way that I can’t when I write – for obvious reasons, of course, with plot structure being a main reason for that.

This “creative blankness” of my painting brain offers me a respite from intellectual thinking that thus reinvigorates my writing brain, inspiring me to return to my writing with renewed energy!

That, I feel, is grand inspiration, even if it isn’t the kind where I can step forward and say “painting this *insert-blank* inspired a sad mood within me that inspired a scene within my novel!” Now, this is the kind of inspiration that I want viewers of my art to have, but not necessarily the kind of inspiration that I myself get from crafting the piece of art. Not that there’s anything wrong with that kind of inspiration. I myself also experience that kind. Just not when I write, that is.

And… I think that’s it?

Yup – that’s it.

I’m outta words.

For now.

underskrift

 

 

 

FiftyWordStory #2

The dim light from above fell on his face in a way that bronzed and honeyed his already warm, glowing skin. I wanted to reach across the table and touch it, just to see if it was as scalding hot as it looked, but what if it was?

WriterWoes #8 – On writing fanfiction…

I recently read an article by Cara Diaconoff, in The Writer’s Chronicle, in which Diaconoff speaks for the inclusion of fanfiction into professional creative writing workshops.

As you’ve probably guessed… that’s what this post will be about…

So, now, let your eyes feast upon Diaconoff’s words as cited below!

“Taking fanfiction seriously leads to a productive interrogation of the concepts of originality, influence and intertextuality (…) Fanfiction writers are, in a sense, super-readers. To write successful fanfiction requires not only the traditional creative writing skills of crafting compelling characters and effectively deploying point of view and voice, but also a high degree of critical and rhetorical sophistication.”

“[Fanfiction writers must have] a complex sense of how texts operate in the world – a deep understanding of how literary and cinematic works construct, teach and manipulate their audiences.”  

(p. 66-67, 2016, The Writer’s Chronicle 49 (1))

So, yes, Diaconoff’s support of fanfiction prompted me to address this matter myself.

Or, that is to say, the matter has been on my mind for years, but Diaconoff’s article prompted me to add my own two cents, here, on my blog.

Now, be justly warned, my two cents are strongly biased!

I grew up in the online fanfiction/fandom community as both an avid consumer and contributor.

You can say, I suppose, that while I always had an interest in writing, fanfiction was where my interest in English writing truly began to flourish. It became my outlet where I could develop my English writing skills and understanding beyond that of my formal schooling. Indeed, as a self-taught writer of my foreign language, the fanfiction community was my primary English teacher aside from what kinda-sparse schooling that I had.

I’ve been a part of that world for about ten years now.

I know everything that there is to know – quiz me, if you want – and I am overjoyed to see that fanfiction is, at last, gaining the recognition that it deserves by professionals and academics.

Now – yes – I am fully aware that the Fifty Shades trilogy is based on Twilight fanfiction.

And – yes – I have read both.

It is my personal opinion that while the Fifty Shades series has done extremely well commercially – possibly thanks to the fanfiction community back when the series was self-published and not yet backed by major publishing houses and media outlets – it is not necessarily the best indicator of what you may find, out there, in the vast world of fanfiction. Not in regards to the erotica element – don’t get me wrong; nothing is “wrong” with that – but in regards to quality, style and voice.

With no professional editors at hand (beta-readers notwithstanding), there is admittedly a lot of Subpar Fanfiction on the internet…

… but there is also a lot of Good Fanfiction ready for reading.

Good Fanfiction has quality, style and a voice of its own. Most importantly, it requires literary intelligence and a deep understanding of intertextuality. As Diaconoff says in her article, it is not an easy task to take something made by someone else and make it your own, but that is exactly what Good Fanfiction does.

I myself started out writing Subpar Fanfiction.

Then I progressed to Good Fanfiction with the help of a supportive community (some of which have now become dear longtime friends to me). This, of course, also included a lot of “learning-by-doing” and “trial-and-error” cases, but, embarrassing as those were, they also made me the writer that I am today, ten years down the line.

So, tell me, please, is that not enough reason to start accrediting fanfiction for what it does – for the fledgling writers that it nurtures – rather than for what it, as some people argue, doesn’t do?

Besides, imitation is the best form of flattery – and, really, when is anything ever fully original in this day and age?

 

WriterWoes #7 – The creative process!

This post is actually inspired from a comment that I made on another post that got me thinking about my structural process when I write stories – and when I unleash my creativity in general, I suppose.

Despite my love for speculative fiction and the world building that this entails, be it large or small, my writing process is not geared towards years of planning and outlining prior to putting my pen to paper.

My creative process, be it painting or writing, is more… visceral, I suppose.

When I paint, I stray away from motifs and settle on abstract, impressionistic scenes.

Likewise, when I write, I get most of my inspiration while I write.

I build my world while I write it.

I do my research while I write.

I rarely ever do much before I start writing.

This means that there’ll be lots of pauses in my writing, where I head off to do extensive research or to expand on my world and characters, but the point still stands that I will have written at least five to ten chapters before I stop to do this.

I also prefer to plan my outline while I write, meaning that, well, my outlines get all sorts of messy, but then I color-code the different branches of the outline, making some of the text bold, some of the text larger, and— you get me?

Suddenly, somehow, there’s now an outline based on aesthetics – on visuals alone!

It makes sense, I guess, having been a painter for as long as I’ve been a writer.

The creative process is different for everyone, but I do think that it’s important to sit down and consider what your creative process is. If anything, simply because it will become far easier to nurture and cultivate your inspiration and motivation that way…

… and who doesn’t want that, amirite?